Corsican Dog

The Corsican Dog is a breed of dog which is used for a variety of working purposes. It is an ancient breed and the dogs were employed most frequently as shepherds and guardians of the home and also made excellent hunting dogs.

As the name suggests, the Corsican dog breed originated from Corsica, France. It is also known by some other names such as Cursinu and Chien Corse.

The breed has existed on the Corsica island since the sixteenth century, but went into decline during the late twentieth century. However, the breed was saved and became recognized by the Société Centrale Canine.

Actually the Corsican dog breed has been known on Corsica island since the sixteenth century. The breed was used as a versatile hunting and farming dog on the island, until the 1950s.

The breed suffered due to competition from continental breeds, during the second half of the twentieth century.

The L’association de Sauvegarde du Chien Corse was set up to safeguard the breed in 1989.

The Corsican dog breed has been recognized by the French kennel club ‘Société Centrale Canine’, since 2003. And it is placed in the spitz and primitive group breeds, as a primitive breed.[1]

Corsican Dog Characteristics

The Corsican dogs are medium in size with a slender build and powerful musculature that sports a striking short brindle coat.

Their coat can be fringed, with usual colors being brindle, fawn, black and tan or brown. The presence of a melanistic mask is permitted under the breed standard. White markings can be on the chest or the legs. The skin of the dog adheres closely to the body, and dewlaps do not appear in the breed.

They tend to have well-proportioned heads with broad, flat skulls and tapered muzzles that are somewhat thin. They have oval eyes which come in shades from chestnut to dark brown and their triangular ears are attached either right at the eye line or slightly above and they fold down near the sides of the head.

The Corsican dogs have long tail which hangs down at rest but frequently curls up over the back or rump when the dog is in action. Skin of these dogs is particularly tight to the body and there is little to no wrinkling or drooping.

Average body height of the mature dog is between 18 and 23 inches at the withers for males, and the females are slightly shorter. And average live body weight of the mature dogs is approximately 25 kg.

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Temperament

The Corsican dog is docile, loyal and very attached to it’s owner. And it is wary of strangers.

It is an intelligent, calm and stable dog breed capable of adapting itself to many situations. It is generally calm at home, and it explodes with energy and speed when in action.

The Corsican is a versatile dog breed, having been used as a sheepdog, as well as to herd cattle and in some instances for dog fighting.

In case of hunting, it is most often used in hunting wild boar, but has also been used for fox and hare hunting.

The Corsican is still used as a herding dog, a watchdog and also for companionship. It can require further training than some other breeds, but can become a pleasant companion to it’s owner.

Lifespan

Average lifespan of the Corsican dog breed is between 9 and 12 years. But sometimes they can even live longer.

Feeding

How much a mature dog eats depends on it’s size, age, build, metabolism and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don’t all need the same amount of food.

The Corsican dogs are medium in size, but they are moderately active. So, their diet should be formulated for a medium sized breed with average exercise needs.

Generally around 2 cups of high quality dry food daily will be enough for a mature dog. You can consult with a vet in your area for better feeding recommendations.

Caring

Taking good care of the animals is very important for raising Corsican dogs. You should always keep up with your dog’s regular veterinary checkups to detect any health concerns early. Your vet will be able to help you to develop a caring routine that will keep your dog healthy.

The Corsican dog is quite capable of being a pleasant and well-behaved companion indoors but does require a great deal of exercise to maintain it’s calm and composed indoor demeanor.

They love short jogs and long walks, so they are well-suited to many alternative forms of exercise. They naturally excel at hunting and tracking trials as well as herding trials and are intelligent and agile enough to do well on agility courses and rally sport (although, their stubborn nature may make these endeavors a bit more challenging)

Generally, a mature Corsican dog should get around an hour to an hour and a half worth of vigorous activity per day.

Grooming maintenance of the Corsican dogs is fairly simple. They only require bathing a few times a year and more frequent bathing can strip the coat of it’s natural oils and lead to brittle fur and dry, flaky skin.

Check their ears for infections on a regular basis and keep them clean and dry. Teeth and nail care are important steps in the grooming routine as well. Weekly brushing of the teeth will aid in tooth and gum health. The nails should be trimmed monthly or as needed.

Health

The Corsican dogs are generally healthy. There are no known breed specific health issues. Although, you should keep good contact with a vet in your area.

Breed NameCorsican
Other NamesAlso known by some other names such as Cursinu and Chien Corse
Breed SizeMedium
HeightBetween 18 and 23 inches at the withers for males, and the females are slightly shorter
WeightApproximately 25 kg
Good as PetsYes
Climate ToleranceAll climates
ColorAll shades of tan and black with or without brindle, limited white patches
LifespanBetween 9 and  12 years or more
Good for ChildrenYes
RarityCommon
Country/Place of OriginFrance

Corsican Dog Facts

Here we will explore the best facts about Corsican dogs, from their history and appearance to their personality and behavior.

  1. Corsican dogs are one of the oldest breeds of dogs in France, with a history that dates back to the Roman times.
  2. They are also known as “Cursinu” because of their curly hair, which is a defining feature of the breed.
  3. Corsican dogs are medium-sized, with males weighing between 25-30kg and females weighing between 20-25kg.
  4. They have a muscular and athletic build, with a short, dense coat that can range in color from brown to black.
  5. Corsican dogs are highly intelligent and trainable, making them a popular choice for hunting and herding.
  6. They are also known for their strong work ethic and loyalty, making them great companions for those who lead an active lifestyle.
  7. Corsican dogs are generally healthy and have a long lifespan, with some living up to 15 years.
  8. They are known to be good with children and make excellent family pets.
  9. Corsican dogs are highly territorial and protective of their owners, making them good watchdogs.
  10. They have a strong prey drive, so early socialization and training are important to prevent them from chasing smaller animals.
  11. Corsican dogs are highly adaptable and can thrive in both rural and urban environments.
  12. They are known for their endurance and can withstand harsh weather conditions, making them ideal for outdoor activities like hiking and camping.
  13. Corsican dogs are highly social animals and thrive in a pack environment.
  14. They are very affectionate with their owners and enjoy spending time with them.
  15. Corsican dogs are highly independent and can be stubborn at times, making them a challenge for novice dog owners.
  16. They require daily exercise and mental stimulation to prevent boredom and destructive behavior.
  17. Corsican dogs are highly trainable and excel in obedience training and agility competitions.
  18. They are also known for their excellent scenting abilities and are often used in search and rescue operations.
  19. Corsican dogs have a strong prey drive, so early socialization and training are important to prevent them from chasing smaller animals.
  20. They have a moderate shedding rate and require regular brushing to maintain their coat.
  21. Corsican dogs are highly intelligent and require mental stimulation to prevent boredom and destructive behavior.
  22. They are known to be vocal and may bark excessively if not trained properly.
  23. Corsican dogs are a rare breed, with only a few hundred registered in France.
  24. They are recognized by the French Kennel Club and are slowly gaining popularity in other parts of the world.
  25. Corsican dogs are a unique breed with a rich history and make excellent companions for those who lead an active lifestyle.

Tips for Raising Corsican Dogs

Here are some best tips for raising Corsican dogs, from training and socialization to diet and exercise.

  1. Start training and socializing your Corsican dog from a young age. Early socialization is essential to prevent behavior problems such as aggression and anxiety.
  2. Use positive reinforcement training methods such as treats, praise, and playtime to encourage good behavior.
  3. Make sure to provide your Corsican dog with plenty of mental and physical stimulation. They have a high energy level and require regular exercise and playtime.
  4. Provide your Corsican dog with a comfortable and secure living space. They require a lot of room to move around and exercise.
  5. Invest in high-quality food and treats that are appropriate for your Corsican dog’s age, size, and activity level.
  6. Avoid overfeeding your Corsican dog, as they can be prone to weight gain and obesity.
  7. Make sure to provide your Corsican dog with plenty of fresh water at all times.
  8. Keep your Corsican dog’s living space clean and free of any hazards or potential dangers.
  9. Provide your Corsican dog with a variety of toys and chews to keep them mentally stimulated and prevent destructive behavior.
  10. Make sure to groom your Corsican dog regularly to keep their coat healthy and shiny.
  11. Provide your Corsican dog with regular veterinary check-ups and vaccinations to prevent illness and disease.
  12. Train your Corsican dog to walk on a leash and use a crate if necessary for transportation or when they are left alone.
  13. Consider enrolling your Corsican dog in obedience classes or hiring a professional trainer if necessary.
  14. Make sure to provide your Corsican dog with plenty of socialization opportunities with other dogs and people.
  15. Provide your Corsican dog with plenty of exercise opportunities, such as walks, runs, hikes, and games of fetch.
  16. Avoid leaving your Corsican dog alone for long periods of time, as they can become anxious and develop behavior problems.
  17. Make sure to supervise your Corsican dog around children and other animals to prevent any potential conflicts.
  18. Provide your Corsican dog with plenty of mental stimulation, such as puzzle toys and games.
  19. Avoid using physical punishment or harsh training methods, as this can lead to fear and aggression.
  20. Make sure to provide your Corsican dog with plenty of love and affection, as they thrive on attention from their owners.
  21. Keep your Corsican dog’s vaccinations and parasite prevention up to date to prevent illness and disease.
  22. Provide your Corsican dog with a comfortable and cozy sleeping area, such as a bed or crate.
  23. Avoid leaving your Corsican dog in a hot or cold environment for extended periods of time.
  24. Make sure to give your Corsican dog plenty of attention and affection, as they are highly social animals.
  25. Provide your Corsican dog with plenty of outdoor playtime and exercise opportunities, such as walks, hikes, and games of fetch.

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