Rideau Arcott Sheep

The Rideau Arcott sheep is a breed of domestic sheep from Canada. It is one of only a few livestock breeds native to Canada. The name Rideau is a common in Ottawa, and the Arcott is an acronym for the Animal Research Centre in Ottawa. The breed was actually developed from a breeding program that was created in 1966 by Agriculture Canada’s Animal Research Centre in Ottawa. Canadian Arcott and the Outauais Arcott are the other breeds that were produce from the same program. When developing the Rideau Arcott, their goat was to create a breed of sheep that produced multiple offspring rapidly. They introduced new technologies in quantitative genetics, reproductive physiology, nutrition and housing that allowed them to select for the traits they wanted to be expressed in the breed. In the year of 1974, the research flock was closed, and the breed was distributed to shepherds beginning in 1988. The Rideau Arcott sheep breed genetically 20 percent Suffolk, 9 percent Shropshire, 14 percent East Friesian, 40 percent Finnish Landrace, 8 percent Dorset Horn, and the remaining 8 percent is Corriedale, Romnelet, North Country Cheviot and Border Leicester. The Rideau Arcott sheep breed has been selectively bred for good growth rate, high milk production, higher fertility and multiple births. However, read some more information about this breed below.

Characteristics
Rideau Arcott sheep is a large breed which is generally of white color. But some animals may have slightly colored legs. Face of these animals is white and free of wool, but a few dark patches sometimes occur. They are usually naturally polled. But some Rideau Arcott rams may develop horny protuberances.
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Average live body weight of the mature Rideau Arcott rams is up to 100 kg. And average live body weight of the mature ewes vary from 70 to 90 kg. Photo and info from Wikipedia.






Uses
Rideau Arcott sheep is a dual-purpose animal. It is good for both meat and fleece production. But today, the breed is raised mainly for meat production.

Special Notes
The Rideau Arcott sheep are very hardy and strong animals. They are kept for both meat and wool production. They have a rapid growth rate, and they produce a medium-quality fleece. The ewes are very prolific, and lambing can occur at around eight months of intervals. The mature ewes produce 40 percent twins and 50 percent triplets, but the ewe lambs have a lambing rate of around 170 percent. Today the breed is popular and noted for it’s higher growth rate, high milk production, multiple births and higher fertility. However, review full breed profile of the Rideau Arcott sheep in the following chart.

Rideau Arcott Sheep | Breed Profile

Breed Name Rideau Arcott
Other Name None
Breed Purpose Meat, wool
Special Notes Very hardy and strong animals, kept for both meat and wool production, rapid growth rate, produce medium-quality fleece, ewes are very prolific
Breed Size Large
Weight Rams weight around 100 kg, and the ewe’s weight vary from 70 to 90 kg
Horns No
Climate Tolerance All climates
Color Usually white
Rarity Common
Country/Place of Origin Canada

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