Modern Farming Methods http://www.roysfarm.com Mon, 18 May 2015 03:53:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Orpington Chicken http://www.roysfarm.com/orpington-chicken/ http://www.roysfarm.com/orpington-chicken/#comments Mon, 18 May 2015 03:53:54 +0000 http://www.roysfarm.com/?p=3550 The Orpington chicken breed was originally developed in England in 1886. It was named as ‘Orpington’ after the town of Orpington, Kent, in south-east England. It was developed mainly to be an excellent layer with good meat quality. Now Orpington chickens are wonderful dual purpose bird and among the top choices for small farms because […]

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The Orpington chicken breed was originally developed in England in 1886. It was named as ‘Orpington’ after the town of Orpington, Kent, in south-east England. It was developed mainly to be an excellent layer with good meat quality. Now Orpington chickens are wonderful dual purpose bird and among the top choices for small farms because they are docile, sweet and grow nice and large. They lay eggs and produce tasty meat and the hens go broody easily. You can have a natural setup for the Orpington chickens where they will reproduce and continue for generations. This chicken breed is also very cold hardy and produce eggs well through frigid winters and dark, short days. Nowadays, Orpington chicken is a popular and attractive breed mainly for it’s large size, soft appearance and it’s rich color and gentle contours. It is also popular as a show bird.

Characteristics
Orpington chickens are heavy in size but loosely feathered, appearing massive. They have better feathering than some other breeds, and their feathering allows them to endure cold temperatures. They are very cold hardy birds. There are two similar but different standards for Orpington chickens. The first one asks for a weight from 3.6kg to 4.55kg for cocks and 2.7kg to 3.6kg for hens by the Poultry Club of Great Britain. They also ask or a broad body with a low stance, heavy and with fluffed-out feathers which make it look large (the down from the body covers most of the legs). Other characteristics of their Orpington chickens include a curvy shape with a short back and U-shaped underline and a small head with medium single comb. The skin color of Orpington chicken is white. Hens lay larger light brown colored eggs. They are pretty good layers and on an average, hens lay about 3-4 eggs per week. They reach maturity earlier. On an average, male Orpington chickens weight around 3.6kg to 4.55kg and females weight around 2.7kg to 3.6kg. Buff, Black, White, and Blue Orpington’s are recognized color varieties of this chicken breed.

Behavior/Temperament
Orpington chickens are good birds to have. They are gentle and docile, calm and patient. They are also great with kids.

Orpington Chicken | Breed Profile

Breed Name Orpington
Other Name None
Breed Purpose Dual Purpose
Breed Temperament Calm, Friendly, Bears Confinement well, Easily Handled, Docile, Quite
Breed Size Heavy (2.7kg – 4.55 kg)
Broodiness Frequent
Comb Single
Climate Tolerance All Climates (very cold hardy)
Egg Color Light Brown
Egg Size Large
Egg Productivity Good (about 3-4 eggs/week)
Feathered Legs No
Rarity Buff is Common (others rare)
Varieties Buff, Black, White, and Blue

The Good

  • Beautiful
  • Calm
  • Docile
  • Gentle
  • Patient
  • Very friendly
  • Fluffy
  • Good layers
  • Go broody and hens are great mothers
  • Good with kids
  • Lay larger light brown eggs
  • Not noisy
  • Winter hardy

The Bad

  • A lot of them look same (hard to tell apart without leg bands)
  • Can get beat up by bossier chickens

Is Orpington Chicken Good for You?
Orpington chickens are good for you if you…….

  • Are willing to raise dual purpose chicken breed.
  • Want to have beautiful chickens with good temperament.
  • Have children and want to raise some friendly chickens.
  • Want to produce large eggs and good quality tasty meat.
  • Are looking for broody chickens which are great mothers also.
  • Are looking for larger birds for your backyard or small farm.
  • Live somewhere in cold areas and looking for cold hardy chickens.

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Rhode Island Red Chicken http://www.roysfarm.com/rhode-island-red-chicken/ http://www.roysfarm.com/rhode-island-red-chicken/#comments Fri, 15 May 2015 09:09:34 +0000 http://www.roysfarm.com/?p=3540 Rhode Island Red chicken is an American dual purpose chicken breed which was developed in Rhode Island and Massachusetts in the mid 1840s. Rhode Island Red chickens are good egg layers but can be raised for both meat and eggs production. They are also good as show bird. This breed is among the most popular […]

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Rhode Island Red chicken is an American dual purpose chicken breed which was developed in Rhode Island and Massachusetts in the mid 1840s. Rhode Island Red chickens are good egg layers but can be raised for both meat and eggs production. They are also good as show bird. This breed is among the most popular chicken breeds for backyard flocks. They are highly popular mainly for their hardiness and egg laying abilities. Rhode Island Red chicken was from the Malay that it got it’s deep color, strong constitution and relatively hard feathers. The early flocks often had both rose and single combed birds. The first Rhode Island Red chickens were originally bred in Adamsville (a village which is part of Little Compton, Rhode Island). A black breasted red Malay cock which was imported from England was one of the foundation sires of the Rhode Island Red chicken breed. As Rhode Island Red chickens have prolific egg laying abilities, so they are used in the creation of many modern hybrid breeds.

Characteristics
Rhode Island Red chickens are relatively hardy and probably they are the best egg layers among the dual purpose breeds. This breed is a good choice for the small flock owner. They continue producing eggs even in poor housing conditions than any other breeds and they can also handle marginal diets. Rhode Island Red is one of the breeds which has excellent exhibition qualities and good production abilities at the same time. They have rectangular, relatively long bodies, typically dark red in color. They have red-orange eyes, reddish-brown beaks. And their feet and legs are yellow (often with a bit of reddish color on the toes and sides of the shanks. Their skin is yellow colored. The bird’s feathers are rust-colored, however darker shades are known, including maroon bordering on black. Rhode Island Red chicks are a light red to tan color. On an average, a male Rhode Island Red weights about 3.9kg and a female weights about 2.9kg.rhode island red chicken, rhode island red chickens, rhode island red chicken facts, rhode island red chicken breed, rhode island red chicken characteristics, rhode island red chicken temperament, rhode island red chicken eggs, rhode island red chicken color

Behavior/Temperament
Rhode Island Red chickens are active, docile and calm. Sometimes, roosters can be a little bit aggressive. This chicken breed is suitable for both confinement and free range system.

Rhode Island Red Chicken | Breed Profile

Breed Name Rhode Island Red
Other Name RIR, Rhode Islands
Breed Purpose Dual Purpose
Breed Temperament Aggressive, Calm, Friendly, Curious, Noisy, Easily Handled
Breed Size Heavy (6.5-8.5 lbs)
Broodiness Seldom (not prone to broodiness)
Comb Large, Single or Rose Combs
Climate Tolerance All Climates (very robust)
Egg Color Brown
Egg Size Large
Egg Productivity Very Good (about 300 eggs/year)
Feathered Legs No
Rarity Common
Varieties Only Recognized in Red

The Good

  • Beautiful
  • Calm
  • Curious
  • Caring for other chicks
  • Prolific layers
  • Lay large eggs
  • Good foragers
  • Lay brown eggs
  • Sturdy birds
  • Mild temperament
  • Not flighty

The Bad

  • Roosters are little bit aggressive
  • Sometimes can be mean to other birds
  • Sometimes bossy
  • Sometimes very loud

Is Rhode Island Red Chicken Good For You?
Rhode Island Red Chickens are good for you if you…….

  • Want to raise highly egg producing chickens.
  • Want to produce larger brown eggs.
  • Want to utilize your kitchen wastes.
  • Are willing to raise some beautiful birds.
  • Are looking for proper chicken breeds which are good foragers.
  • Want to raise some hardy chickens which can survive in all climates.
  • Are looking for a dual purpose chicken breed which produce more eggs than meat.

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Ameraucana Chicken http://www.roysfarm.com/ameraucana-chicken/ http://www.roysfarm.com/ameraucana-chicken/#comments Thu, 14 May 2015 17:31:40 +0000 http://www.roysfarm.com/?p=3535 The Ameraucana chicken is an American domestic chicken breed which was developed in the United States in the 1970s. This breed was developed by a few people who were trying to standardize the Araucana breed. The Ameraucana was bred from chickens from a South American country (Chile) that carried the blue egg gene. And was […]

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The Ameraucana chicken is an American domestic chicken breed which was developed in the United States in the 1970s. This breed was developed by a few people who were trying to standardize the Araucana breed. The Ameraucana was bred from chickens from a South American country (Chile) that carried the blue egg gene. And was bred to maintain the blue colored eggs of that breed while eliminating the lethal recessive gene. A breeder’s club was formed in 1976 which is now called the Ameraucana Breeders Club. There is also a bantam variety of Ameraucana chicken.

Characteristics
Ameraucana chicken lay blue colored eggs. And it is one of the chicken breeds which lay blue colored eggs. The Ameraucana chickens have may similarities to the Araucana chickens. The main similarities are the pea comb and the blue egg gene. The Araucana is rumpless and has earmuffs. And the Ameraucana chicken has a tail and is bearded and muffed.  The wattles of this chicken breed is small or absent, the earlobes are small and round. The color of comb, earlobes and wattles are all red. The shanks are slate-blue, tending to black in the Black variety. Ameraucana chicken breed is viewed as a variety of Araucana in UK and Australia. On an average, a standard Ameraucana male weights about 3kg and a female weights about 2.5kg. And the male and female of bantam variety weight between 740g-850g. Ameraucana hens lay blue eggs in various shades. The recognized colors of Ameraucana chicken are Black, Blue, Blue Wheaten, Brown Red, Buff, Silver, Wheaten and White.ameraucana chicken, ameraucana chickens, ameraucana chicken breed, ameraucana chicken eggs, ameraucana chicken color, ameraucana chicken temperament, ameraucana chicken characteristics

Behavior/Temperament
Ameraucana chickens are friendly and can be fun. Their personalities can vary widely from bird to bird. Probably because they are mixed-breed.

Ameraucana Chicken | Breed Profile

Breed Name Ameraucana
Other Name None
Breed Purpose Dual Purpose
Breed Temperament Aggressive, Bears confinement well, Calm, Friendly, Fighty, Curious, Gentle
Breed Size Heavy (5.5-6.5 lbs)
Broodiness Average (not very broody)
Comb Pea
Climate Tolerance All Climates (cold hardy)
Egg Color Blue in various shades
Egg Size Medium
Egg Productivity About 3 eggs per week
Feathered Legs No
Rarity Common (ture Ameraucanas are rare)
Varieties Black, Blue, Blue Wheaten, Brown Red, Buff, Silver, Wheaten and White

The Good

  • Cold hardy
  • Curious
  • Gentle
  • Nice voice
  • Varied personalities
  • Pretty good layers
  • Lay blue colored eggs in various shades
  • Good for both confined and free range system
  • Good forager

The Bad

  • Jumpy
  • Some dislikes being held
  • Very shy

Is Ameraucana Good for You?
The Ameraucana chicken is good for you if you…….

  • Want to have friendly chickens.
  • Want to raise some chickens which are good foragers.
  • Love to produce blue colored eggs in various shades.
  • Want to raise gentle, curious chickens with various personalities.

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Speckled Sussex Chicken http://www.roysfarm.com/speckled-sussex-chicken/ http://www.roysfarm.com/speckled-sussex-chicken/#comments Mon, 11 May 2015 17:08:39 +0000 http://www.roysfarm.com/?p=3517 Speckled Sussex chicken is a dual purpose breed which originated in Sussex county, England in the early of 19th century. Now this chicken breed is also popular in many countries. Sussex chickens have various colors and have a bantam version (about 1/4 of original). It was bred mainly as a table bird. But now it […]

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Speckled Sussex chicken is a dual purpose breed which originated in Sussex county, England in the early of 19th century. Now this chicken breed is also popular in many countries. Sussex chickens have various colors and have a bantam version (about 1/4 of original). It was bred mainly as a table bird. But now it has become a dual purpose breed and suitable for both meat and egg production.

Characteristics
Speckled Sussex chicken is famous as a table bird. They are ideal for fattening and have pinkish white skin and long, deep body. In the heavy chicken breed class, they are of medium sized. Speckled Sussex hens lay light brown or tinted color eggs. Their plumage is of rich mahogany base color with individual feathers ending in a white tip separated from the rest of the feathers by a black bar. Which is a delight to the eyes. Speckled Sussex baby chicks vary greatly in color from dark chestnut to a creamy buff and some chicks also have alternate light and dark stripes lengthwise on the back. Speckled Sussex chicken combines beauty with utility and is very suitable for dual purpose and for showing. This breed can weight about 7-8 lbs.speckled sussex chicken, speckled sussex chickens, speckled sussex chicken characteristics, speckled sussex chicken temperament, speckled sussex chicken personality, speckled sussex chicken egg production

Behavior/Temperament
Speckled Sussex chickens are curious, friendly and most importantly gentle. This chicken breed tend to have more personality than some other breeds. They are cold hardy and the hens can be broody.

Speckled Sussex | Breed Profile
Breed Name Speckled Sussex
Other Name None
Breed Purpose Dual Purpose
Breed Temperament Calm, Friendly, Curious, Gentle
Breed Size Heavy (7-8 lbs)
Broodiness Frequent
Comb Single Comb
Climate Tolerance All Climates (cold hardy)
Egg Color Light Brown or tinted
Egg Size Large
Egg Productivity About 4 eggs per week
Feathered Legs No
Rarity Common
Varieties Sussex chicken have many varieties

The Good

  • Calm
  • Curious
  • Friendly
  • Gentle
  • Pretty
  • Lay large light brown eggs
  • Will fit with your older or existing flock
  • Perfect for raising in backyard

The Bad

  • Sometimes too Curious
  • Tend to wander farther from home
  • Roosters can be a little evil

Is Speckled Sussex Chicken Good For You?
Speckled Sussex Chicken will be good for you if you…….

  • Want to raise some great chickens which will be friendly with your children.
  • Want to have some chickens with great personalities.
  • Live somewhere with colder winters.
  • Want to keep some chickens for fattening.
  • Want to raise dual purpose breed.
  • Want to raise chickens in your backyard.
  • Are interested in having beautiful chickens as pets.

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Plymouth Rock Chicken http://www.roysfarm.com/plymouth-rock-chicken/ http://www.roysfarm.com/plymouth-rock-chicken/#comments Sat, 09 May 2015 12:30:05 +0000 http://www.roysfarm.com/?p=3508 Plymouth Rock chicken is a dual purpose breed suitable for both meat and eggs production. Plymouth Rock chicken originated in the United States. This breed is also known as some other name such as Rocks or Barred Rocks. It comes with a variety of colors and the birds are cold hardy and a great breed […]

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Plymouth Rock chicken is a dual purpose breed suitable for both meat and eggs production. Plymouth Rock chicken originated in the United States. This breed is also known as some other name such as Rocks or Barred Rocks. It comes with a variety of colors and the birds are cold hardy and a great breed for small farm or for raising in backyard. The Plymouth Rock was developed in New England in the middle of the 19th century and was first exhibited as a breed in 1849. Most of the farmers raise them as a dual purpose breed and they are valued for both of their meat and egg laying ability. The first Plymouth Rock chicken was barred and other varieties were developed later. This breed is very popular in the United States and some other countries. The main reason of it’s popularity is it’s qualities. Plymouth Rock chicken is an outstanding farm breed which is popular for their hardiness, broodiness, docility and excellent production of both meat and eggs. Most of the varieties of Plymouth Rock chicken were developed from crosses containing some of the same ancestral background as the barred variety. Early in the development of this breed, the name Plymouth Rock implied a barred bird. But as more varieties were developed, it become the disignation for the breed. During the 1920s, the Barred Plymouth Rock was one of the foundation breeds for the broiler industry. The Barred Plymouth Rock is also raised for genetic hackle used extensively as a material in artificial fly construction.

Characteristics
Plymouth Rock chickens are hardy, long-lived and larger sized breed. Some of the varieties of this breed are mainly raised for meat and some of the varieties are good layers. Plymouth Rock chickens have a moderately deep full breast and they possess a long broad back. Their legs and skin color is yellow. No feathers in their legs. The hens have a deep, full abdomen and it is a sign of good layer. Plymouth Rock chickens have bay-colored eyes, their face is red with red ear lobes and have a bright yellow beak. They have single comb and the size of the comb is moderate. Their feathers are short and fairly loosely held but not so long as to easily tangle. Like the baby chick’s feathers, Plymouth Rock chicken’s bottom feathers are soft and downy. This chicken breed comes with a variety of colors. Such as barred, buff, blue, black, columbian, partridge, silver penciled, white, light barred, dark barred etc. On an average, a mature male Plymouth Rock chicken weight up to 8 lbs and a hen weight about 7.5 lbs. Egg production vary depending on the strains of the bird. But on an average, hens lay about 4 eggs per week.plymouth rock chicken, plymouth rock chickens, plymouth rock chicken temperamant, plymouth rock chicken characteristics, plymouth rock chicken facts, plymouth rock chicken egg production, plymouth rock chicken history, rock chicken, barred rock chicken

Behavior/Temperament
Both Plymouth Rock roosters and hens are calm and they will live happily with people and other animals such as pets. They are docile and friendly in nature and usually do well even when confined. But they will be happier if they can roam freely on pasture or in a garden. Plymouth Rock hens will seldom go broody in the right environment and they are good mothers.

Plymouth Rock | Breed Profile

Breed Name Plymouth Rock
Other Name Rocks, Barred Rocks
Breed Purpose Dual Purpose
Breed Temperament Bears Confinement Well, Calm, Docile, Easily Handled, Friendly
Breed Size Heavy (7-8 lbs)
Broodiness Seldom
Comb Single Comb
Climate Tolerance All Climates (very cold hardy)
Egg Color Light Brown
Egg Size Large
Egg Productivity Depends on the strains of the birds (on an average, about 4 eggs per week)
Feathered Legs No
Rarity Barred Rocks and White Rocks are common. All other varieties are rare.
Varieties Barred, buff, blue, black, columbian, partridge, silver penciled, white, light barred, dark barred etc.

The Good

  • Beautiful
  • Friendly
  • Hardy (very cold tolerant)
  • Good layer
  • Good for meat production
  • Do well confined
  • Protective (generally cautious of predators)
  • Curious
  • Great as pets
  • Hens seldom go broody and are good mothers

The Bad

  • Can be bullies sometimes
  • Some have trouble with very hot weather
  • Can be stubborn sometimes

Is Plymouth Rock Chicken Good For You?
Plymouth Rock chicken will be good for you if you…….

  • Want to raise dual purpose chickens for both meat and egg production.
  • Want to keep some cold hardy birds.
  • Want to raise some friendly and beautiful chickens as pets.
  • Are interested in large size chickens.
  • Want to produce light brown colored and large eggs.
  • Looking for fast growing chicken breeds.
  • Are willing to raise some beautiful birds in your backyard.
  • Have a small farm.
  • Have small children and want a friendly and docile breed.
  • Live somewhere with cold winters.

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New Hampshire Chicken http://www.roysfarm.com/new-hampshire-chicken/ http://www.roysfarm.com/new-hampshire-chicken/#comments Wed, 06 May 2015 14:49:09 +0000 http://www.roysfarm.com/?p=3494 The New Hampshire chicken (also known as New Hampshire Red) breed originated in the New Hampshire state in the United States. It is not a pure chicken breed. They were developed from the Rhode Island Red chicken breed around 1915 in New Hampshire. This chicken breed was developed initially as a commercial breed for meat […]

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The New Hampshire chicken (also known as New Hampshire Red) breed originated in the New Hampshire state in the United States. It is not a pure chicken breed. They were developed from the Rhode Island Red chicken breed around 1915 in New Hampshire. This chicken breed was developed initially as a commercial breed for meat production. But they are now so different that they are their own breed. And they produce more meat and fewer eggs compared to Rhode Island Red chickens. The New Hampshire Red was first standardised by the American Poultry Association in 1935. And later this breed become popular in some other countries such as UK, Germany, Netherlands etc. New Hampshire chickens become mature early and their feathers grow quickly compared to other common chicken breeds. They lay larger sized and brown colored eggs.

Characteristics
New Hampshire chicken possess a deep and broad body. Their feathers grow very rapidly. New Hampshire hens are prone to go broody. Most of the pin feathers of this breed are a reddish, brownish buff in color. But do not detract from the carcass appearance very much. The color is a medium to light red and often fades in the sunshine. They have single comb which is medium to large in size. The comb often lops over a bit in the females. They are pretty good layer, but mainly raised for meat production. Hens lay larger sized brown eggs (although some strains lay dark brown colored eggs). This chicken breed is aggressive and competitive with other chickens. Hew Hampshire chicken is also good for show purpose. Male New Hampshire chicken weight around 3.9 kg and female weight around 2.9 kg. Their skin color is yellow.new hampshire chicken, new hampshire chickens, new hampshire chicken characteristics, new hampshire chicken for meat, new hampshire chicken temperament, new hampshire chicken egg color

Behavior/Temperament
New Hampshire chickens can have different personalities. Some of them can be aggressive and some of them can be calm, docile and curious. They are suitable for raising in both confined and free range systems.

New Hampshire | Breed Profile

Breed Name New Hampshire
Other Name New Hampshire Red
Breed Purpose Dual Purpose
Breed Temperament Bears Confinement Well, Calm, Docile, Easily Handled, Friendly, Quiet
Breed Size Heavy (7-8 lbs)
Broodiness Yes (Frequent)
Comb Single Comb
Climate Tolerance All Climates
Egg Color Brown
Egg Size Large
Egg Productivity Medium (around 200 eggs per year)
Feathered Legs No
Rarity Common
Varieties Red

The Good

  • Good for dual purpose
  • Very good for meat production
  • Pretty good layers
  • They are definitely gorgeous
  • Not too noisy
  • Intelligent
  • Docile
  • Calm
  • Friendly
  • Hardy
  • Large

The Bad

  • Not the best mothers
  • Eat a lot
  • Some of the chickens can be aggressive and competitive with other chickens

Is New Hampshire chicken Good for You?
New Hampshire chicken is good for you if you…….

  • Want to raise good looking, beautiful chickens.
  • Want to have more meat production than eggs.
  • Want larger sized brown eggs.
  • Looking for a proper breed that lays fewer eggs and produces more meat.
  • Searching for early maturing chickens.
  • Want to raise dual purpose breeds.
  • Want to have beautiful chickens as pets.
  • Have time, space and interest in raising chickens.

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Wyandotte Chicken http://www.roysfarm.com/wyandotte-chicken/ http://www.roysfarm.com/wyandotte-chicken/#comments Tue, 05 May 2015 08:34:31 +0000 http://www.roysfarm.com/?p=3481 Wyandotte chicken breed is one of the prettiest and good looking breeds of the poultry world. They were originated in the U.S. in the 1870’s. Wyandotte chickens are not a pure breed. They were made of mostly Sebrights and Cochins, experts agree that Brahmas and Spangled Hamburgs were used in making the breed. Wyandottes are […]

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Wyandotte chicken breed is one of the prettiest and good looking breeds of the poultry world. They were originated in the U.S. in the 1870’s. Wyandotte chickens are not a pure breed. They were made of mostly Sebrights and Cochins, experts agree that Brahmas and Spangled Hamburgs were used in making the breed. Wyandottes are dual purpose chicken breed and are good layers. They are very hardy, productive birds and lay right through the winter. They can tolerate low temperature and survive in the winter. Their striking and contrasting plumage make them a particular standout in the flock. Wyandotte chickens come with different color variety. But the Silver Laced variety is the most common and very popular variety. And Silver Laced Wyandottes are the original variety of the breed. Wyandottes usually have a white ring of feathers around their neck. This chicken breed is docile and hens are devoted mothers.

Physical Appearance
Wyandotte chickens are medium sized birds with quite long clean legs and a rose comb. Their legs are yellow. The feathers of this chicken breed are broad and loosely fitting. The area around the vent is very fluffy. Their feathering is often laced and always glamorous. There are a total of 17 known colors, including the most common silver laced, golden laced, buff, black, partridge, silver pencilled, lavender, blue laced, pure white etc. Their comb and wattles are deep and glorious red. On an average, a Wyandotte male weights around 8.5 lbs and a female weights around 6 lbs.wyandotte chicken, wyandotte chickens, wyandotte chicken breed, wyandotte chicken egg color, wyandotte chicken characteristics

Behavior/Temperament
Wyandotte chicken is a very easygoing and gentle bird. But they have a tendency toward dominating other birds in the flock and have strong personalities. They prefer to free range and are good foragers. Wyandotte chickens are little bit noisy. Hens incubate eggs and are good mothers. They are very energetic and it’s really fun to have some Wyandottes around.

Breed Profile
See details of Wyandotte chicken breed below.

Wyandotte Chicken | Breed Profile

Breed Name Wyandotte
Breed Purpose Dual Purpose
Breed Temperament Bears Confinement Well, Calm, Docile, Easily Handled, Friendly, Quiet
Breed Size Medium/Heavy (6-8 lbs)
Broodiness Yes (Frequent)
Comb Rose Comb
Climate Tolerance Cold (Hardy in Winter)
Egg Color Brown
Egg Size Large
Egg Productivity Medium (around 200 eggs per year)
Feathered Legs No (Clean Yellow Colored Legs)
Rarity Common
Varieties Silver laced, golden laced, buff, black, partridge, silver pencilled, lavender, blue laced, pure white etc.

The Good

  • Good egg layer
  • Friendly
  • Cold hardy
  • Easy to care
  • Great mother
  • Very beautiful
  • Amazing colorful feathers
  • Like to play around
  • Gentle
  • Good for dual purpose

The Bad
Wyandotte chickens are a bit noisy. Not everyone likes the sound of chickens. So, it can be a problem if you live in urban areas.

Is Wyandotte Good for You?
Yes, Wyandotte chickens are good for you if you…….

  • Want to raise dual purpose chicken breed.
  • Like birds with colorful and beautiful feathers.
  • Have some land and time to raise some chickens.
  • Want to produce some fresh eggs by your own.
  • Want to have fresh chicken meat.
  • Want to incubate eggs and take care of the chicks by your own chickens.
  • Love to have some chickens as pets.

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Raising Chickens From Day Old Chicks http://www.roysfarm.com/raising-chickens-from-day-old-chicks/ http://www.roysfarm.com/raising-chickens-from-day-old-chicks/#comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 06:52:58 +0000 http://www.roysfarm.com/?p=3407 Raising chickens from day old chicks is involved with lots of work. And it requires you to check on them often during the first few weeks. Although, it’s really fun and very pleasuring to take care of them and watch them turn from downy, fluffy little balls into feathered birds. You can easily raise some […]

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Raising chickens from day old chicks is involved with lots of work. And it requires you to check on them often during the first few weeks. Although, it’s really fun and very pleasuring to take care of them and watch them turn from downy, fluffy little balls into feathered birds. You can easily raise some day old chicks to happy and healthy laying hens or roosters if you know the basics of raising chickens. Here we are trying to describe more about raising chickens from day old chicks.

Get Baby Chicks
First of all, determine the number of birds you want to raise and select a breed according to your needs. Then purchase chicks from any of your nearest poultry supplier/breeder. You can purchase the chicks directly from a breeding farm or from a supplier in your area. Nowadays, some breeding farm or suppliers take and handle order through online. So, you can take this advantages too. We recommend visiting the farm or supply store directly and then purchase chicks.

Setup the Brooder
Setting up brooder is a must for raising chickens from day old chicks. Brooder provides adequate temperature, shelter and protection to the chicks for their first few weeks of age. Ensure that the brooder is dry, clean and safe. Use at least 4 inches litter in the brooder. You can make the litter with wood shavings, husk or newspaper. In case of using newspaper, the litter doesn’t need to be 4 inches. It will be better if you use a few layer of papers. Temperature management is very important in the brooder. Chicks require about 95° Fahrenheit temperature for the first week. Reduce the temperature each week at the rate of 5° Fahrenheit per week until the temperature reaches 70° Fahrenheit. You can use a heat lamp above the brooder for maintaining the temperature.raising chickens from day old chicks, how to raise chickens from day-old chicks, how to raise day old chicks

Gather Chick Supplies
Chicks require some specific supplies. Gather the supplies before starting. Smaller sized (chick-sized) supplies are good for this purpose. For example, using chick-sized feeders or waterers will make the first few weeks easier. Using smaller waterer will help the chicks not to drown. And chick-sized feeders will help the chicks to take food easily. Bedding is also needed for the baby chicks. Ensure, you have all the required supplies before starting.

After Getting Your Chicks
After getting your chicks, check everything and make everything ready for them. Then settle them into the brooder so that they stay warm and happy. Probably your chicks are stressed due to the shipping process from hatchery or store. So, gently bring them out from the box and dip their beaks into water. Then let them take rest and acclimate to their new home. Monitor the activities of chicks in the brooder. If they scatter to the edges, they may be too hot, so you’ll need to raise the lamp. And if the chicks huddle under the lamp, they may be too cold, so lower the lamp. For the first few weeks, you need to check on them at least five times a day. And gradually less after that. You have to keep them safe from other animals and overhandling by children. You also need to monitor their temperature. Always try to keep their feed and water fresh and clean.

Feeding & Watering
Start with a chick starter and continue feeding for a few weeks. Depending on the type of your chickens (broiler or layer), you need to go to grower or finisher afterwards. Also ensure availability of sufficient amount of clean and fresh water for all time.

Moving the Chicks to A Coop
After 4-5 weeks, your chicks are ready to move to their main coop for full time. Remove the heat lamp, if you use the brooder as their main coop.

Caring for Growing Chickens
When the baby chick stage passes and they are moved to a new coop, now you have young pullets and cockerels. In this stage, you have to feed them grower feed until they start laying eggs. In this stage, they will require less care compared to baby chicks. You can also allow them outside in this stage. If you allow them outside and if they start eating from outside, then you have to add some grit (small stones) to their feed. Because grit help the chickens to grind up grass, bugs and other foods which they eat from outside. Your hens will start laying eggs at their 4-6 months of age.

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Raising Chickens for Meat http://www.roysfarm.com/raising-chickens-for-meat/ http://www.roysfarm.com/raising-chickens-for-meat/#comments Wed, 15 Apr 2015 10:13:59 +0000 http://www.roysfarm.com/?p=3387 Raising a few chickens for meat is a good way to fulfill your family nutrition demands. At the same time, raising chickens for meat is a fantastic, interesting, exciting and rewarding experience also. If you love animals and have time, space and want to produce fresh foods of your own for your family, then you […]

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Raising a few chickens for meat is a good way to fulfill your family nutrition demands. At the same time, raising chickens for meat is a fantastic, interesting, exciting and rewarding experience also. If you love animals and have time, space and want to produce fresh foods of your own for your family, then you should consider raising chickens for meat. Nowadays, general health conscious people are becoming interested in organic foods and some of them want to produce fresh foods by their own. That’s why raising chickens for meat at home is becoming a popular practice in almost every parts of the world. Meat chickens are also called broilers and raised mainly for meat production. But the chickens raised commercially in large farms are smaller and lower in quality than the chickens raised in a backyard flock. Raising a few chickens for meat is surprisingly easy. And people of all ages and professions can raise a few chickens for meat and it’s also suitable for the people who have limited space. However, here we are describing more about the procedures of raising chickens for meat.

Choosing Breeds
Choosing quality breeds is very important. Most of the meat chicken breeds grow faster and reach slaughtering age earlier. They are truly a breed apart from laying chicken breeds. Although, laying chickens also produce meat. But they take long time to grow and older chickens tend to be tough and stringy. Most of the commercial broiler farms used to raise Cornish Rocks chicken. Cornish Rocks is not a pure breed. They are result of cross between a Cornish rooster and a White Plymouth Rock hen. Cornish Rocks grow big very quickly and become suitable for slaughtering within 6-8 weeks. There are also some other broiler chicken breeds available. If you want to grow free range broilers then Indian Game (Cornish), Ixworth, Hubbard, Sasso etc. will be most suitable for you. There are some dual purpose breeds also which produce some eggs and quality meat at the same time. Dorking, Ixworth, Sussex, Transylvanian Naked Neck, Orpington etc. are some dual purpose breeds. You can also consider some heritage or multipurpose breeds for meat production. Delaware, Holland, New Hampshire, Plymouth Rock etc. will be most suitable for the same. If you plan for raising few chickens, then you can go with any breed. We prefer dual purpose pure breeds for meat production instead of any crosses.raising chickens for meat, raising chickens for meat at home, raising meat chickens, how to raise chickens for meat

Where to Buy Meat Chickens?
This is a most important question people ask. To be frank, it’s really tough for us to tell the exact location from where you can purchase the breeds. Please contact any poultry chick supplier in your area. Ask them which breeds they have and also ask whether they can manage your desired breed or not. Poultry breeders/chick suppliers have a network and hope they will be able to help you getting your desired breed. If they can’t find anywhere, then you should consider importing the breeds from the origin country or location.

Raising Chicks
Raising chicks is vary important part of the meat chicken rearing journey. You have to setup everything before bringing the chicks to your home. After arriving the chicks to your home, you have to take good care of them for the next few days or weeks. Follow the steps mentioned below.

Setting up The Brooder
Brooder is a must for keeping your birds contained, clean and warm. Setup your brooder before arriving the chicks. You can either make the brooder yourself or take help form others. Keep in mind that, the container (which you are using for making the brooder) must have to be more than 12″ high and there are no needs to have a top. The brooder also does not have to be fancy, because the chicks will live in the brooder for 3 weeks only. It will be enough if the brooder is suitable enough for proving warmth, ventilation and protection from predators. Ensure at least 3/4 square feet space available for each chick. Cover the floor of the brooder with about 4 inches litter. You can use husk or wood shavings as litter. You can also use newspaper. Place a heat lamp above the brooder. Chicks need 95° Fahrenheit temperature for the first week. Reduce the temperature of brooder every week at the rate of 5° Fahrenheit per week until it reaches 70° Fahrenheit. Use a small waterer inside the brooder so that the chicks don’t drown. Use starter chick feed for the first few weeks and then use grower feeds.

Caring Growing Birds
Caring growing birds is easy compared to raising chicks. At this stage, you have to feed them grower feeds. In case of free range chickens, you can allow them to browse pasture when they are fully feathered.

Making a Coop
You can move your birds to a new big coop after 3 weeks. Build a coop/house for your birds according to their numbers. On an average, meat chickens require about 2-2.5 square feet flooring space. Keep this in mind while building coop/house for your birds. There are numerous designs available. Search online for some designs which is perfect for your needs. Ensure proper ventilation system and clean their house on a regular basis.

Feeding and Watering
Provide your birds with adequate nutritious foods. You can either choose ready-made foods or prepare the foods yourself. You can also feed kitchen wastes to your birds. Depending on their age, provide them starter, grower and finisher feeds. And provide them sufficient amount of clean and fresh water according to their demand.raising chickens for meat, raising chickens for meat at home, raising meat chickens, how to raise chickens for meat

Health Care
Taking good care of your birds will keep them free form almost all types of health problems. Vaccinate them timely so that they stay free from diseases or sickness.

Raising Meat Chickens on Pasture
You can raise your meat chickens in a house with a small run attached. But allowing them to a pasture will improve their meat quality. For family use, we love raising the meat birds on pasture. The meat of the chickens which are raised in pasture is higher in omega-3s and better in taste. And your birds will grow in a happy environment. It’s also very enjoyable and pleasuring to monitor the activities of meat chickens in a pasture. They will keep your pasture clean and free from bugs. Along will this, you will notice the feeding costs reduced dramatically. Heritage or multipurpose chicken breeds will be very suitable for raising in pasture.

If you raise a few birds and don’t consider it as a business, then raising chickens for meat is a great option for you. It will give you much pleasure and entertainment and home grown fresh foods at the same time.

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How To Get Accepted To Vet School http://www.roysfarm.com/how-to-get-accepted-to-vet-school/ http://www.roysfarm.com/how-to-get-accepted-to-vet-school/#comments Tue, 14 Apr 2015 02:51:30 +0000 http://www.roysfarm.com/?p=3378 There are many people around the globe who love animals very much. And the rate of raising some pet animals are increasing day by day. As a result, working opportunities as a veterinarian is increasing. Do you love animals and enjoy taking care of them? If yes then you might be considering becoming a vet. […]

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There are many people around the globe who love animals very much. And the rate of raising some pet animals are increasing day by day. As a result, working opportunities as a veterinarian is increasing. Do you love animals and enjoy taking care of them? If yes then you might be considering becoming a vet. The demand for vets in some rich countries like USA, Canada, Australia, UK etc. is increasing rapidly. People of those countries are raising pets more than the people of other countries. People who raise animals commercially for business purpose also need vet. And as the demand of vets is increasing, so it can be a good and stable job to have. However, getting accepted to a vet school is not so easy. Here we are describing some tips about how to get accepted to vet school.

How To Get Accepted To Vet School
Follow the steps for getting accepted to a vet school. We have shortly described the steps here.

First of all you have to determine whether you feel comfortable working with animals or not. For becoming a vet you must have to love animals and be prepared to working with them. If you get scared by any animals then you don’t need to apply for this. You must have to made your mind prepared for doing all tasks related to this occupation.

There are plenty of options in this job. You can work with cats, dogs, horses, wildlife, marine animals or various types of domestic or farm animals. Also consider if you want to be a vet surgeon, technician, a vet’s assistant etc. So, think about what kind of vet you want to be.how to get accepted to vet school, how to get accepted to veterinary school, how to get admitted to vet school, how to get into vet school, how to get accepted into vet school, vet school, veterinary school

Research a lot about all the advantages and difficulties for you as a vet. It would be better if you know clearly what you are going to do. Search online and your nearest vet centers practically for more information about vets in your area. Also try to understand about the social dignity of a vet in your area and country. In a word try to learn as much as possible about vets. The more you will be able to learn the better off you will be. Nowadays, demand for vet in large commercial farms is increasing throughout the world. Because people are planning for more food production in accordance with the rapid global population growth. You can take this opportunity.

If you are serious about becoming a vet then you should start working on this when you are in high school or even in middle school. You have to obtain good results/grades throughout your four years of high school and even eighth grade. How many things can you handle at once? Collages look for intelligent students that can handle a lot of things at once. Along with good grades/results it would be better if you join sports team, clubs, speak a foreign language, volunteer and do a part time job.

Try to learn how many vet schools are there in your area or country. Learn what are their requirements from the applicant and prepare yourself perfectly. You can directly visit the vet schools to learn more about this practically. Some vet schools also offer partial training for the general people. If you want to run a profitable farm but not in the age of getting admitted to vet schools, then you can participate in such partial practical training.

Tips & Cautions

  • For becoming a vet, it would be better if you own an or some animals.
  • It will be more beneficial for you to learn more about the animals, observe them perfectly and developing a connection with them.
  • Always keep good communications and get involved with the schools you like.
  • Some schools have lots of opportunities for high school students to volunteer and some have events. Try to attend all of their volunteer activities and events.
  • During admission session, apply earlier. The earlier the better. But don’t send numerous recommendation letters than the requested number. Because doing this will make you look like you are trying to hide something.
  • Once again, the most important thing to be considered for becoming a veterinarian is loving the animals and making your minds for caring them.

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